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We offer computerized engine diagnostic testing services.
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265 W Coshocton St Johnstown Ohio 43031

(740) 967-3000

K-Ceps Service Center Services

Air Conditioning Service/Repair
Did you know that without regular maintenance an air conditioner loses about 5% of its original efficiency per year? This means that without proper maintenance, your air conditioning unit may be performing as poorly as other models that are years older! But there is good news; you can still recover most of that lost efficiency. Schedule an appointment with one of our factory-trained professionals—we understand all aspects of AC repair, from modern computerized components to environmental disposal concerns. Turn to us, your qualified source for everything related to your air conditioning system. The following is a brief schematic of some of the basic components that comprise this system: Compressor:
  • The compressor is a belt-driven device that compresses refrigerant gas and transfers it into the condenser. The compressor is the core of your vehicle’s air conditioning system.
Condenser:
  • The condenser’s primary function is to cool the refrigerator. The condenser dissipates heat released by compressed gases and condenses them into high pressure liquids.
Receiver (Drier):
  • The receiver is a metal container that serves as a storage receptacle for the refrigerant; also known as a drier because it absorbs moisture from the refrigerant and filters out harmful debris and acids. You should change your drier every 3-4 years to ensure quality filtration and prevent any chemical damage.
Orifice Tube/Expansion Valve:
  • The orifice tube (also known as the expansion valve) is a controlling mechanism that regulates refrigerant flow throughout the system. It also converts high pressure liquid refrigerant (from the condenser) into low pressure liquid, so that it can enter the evaporator.
Evaporator:
  • The evaporator removes heat from the inside of your vehicle. The evaporator allows the refrigerant to absorb heat, causing it to boil and change into a vapor. When this occurs, the vapor leaves the evaporator through the compressor, cooling your car and reducing humidity. The evaporator houses the most refrigerant in the heat transfer process and harmful acids can corrode it. This corrosion typically damages the evaporator beyond repair.
Air Filters
In order for your vehicle to run, it needs an exact mixture of fuel and air. The air for this mixture first goes through the air filter to protect the engine from dirt and other particles that could harm it. To keep your vehicle operating correctly, you should change your air filter regularly, like during your annual tune up. If you live in an area with dirt roads or heavy pollution, you may need to have your air filter changed more frequently. Your vehicle also performs better and gets better gas mileage with a clean filter. Contact us today and we will assist you and answer your air filter questions.
Alignments
When your vehicle alignment is not proportioned correctly, two issues may occur:
  1. Driving becomes more expensive
  2. Driving becomes more dangerous
Driving without proper alignment costs you money. Not only does flawed alignment decrease gas mileage and tire life, but it also adds stress to your vehicle’s steering equipment and structure. Ideally, your vehicle’s wheels should run perpendicular to the ground and parallel to each other. Adjusting these wheel angles will bring your vehicle back into proper alignment. Driving without proper alignment puts you at risk. An out-of-alignment car pulls and drifts away from a straight road and may cause an accident. Excessive tire wear—another result of bad car alignment—leads to tire blow-outs and poor traction, which also causes accidents. Bring in your vehicle and our alignment experts will make sure your vehicle drives smoothly and safely.
How does poor alignment happen?
  • Many factors impact your vehicle’s alignment. You typically need alignment service after a major or minor collision that results in physical damage to your vehicle’s frame.
  • Your vehicle needs immediate attention when you notice steering problems or uneven tire wear patterns on your tires.
  • Sometimes problems arise from something as small as driving over a pothole, or grazing over a curb.
Look for the following symptoms to determine if you require our computerized alignment services.
Caster:
A faulty caster angle causes loose or difficult steering. Caster describes the steering pivot angle, as seen from the vehicle’s side and measured in degrees. Caster alignment plays a large role in evaluating the “feel” of steering and the stability. Three to five degrees of positive caster is typical for most vehicles and lower angles for heavier vehicles.
Camber:
A faulty camber angle will create pulling and tire wear. Camber is the angle of the wheel in relation to a vertical direction (seen from the front or rear of the car). A negative camber measurement occurs when a wheel leans toward the vehicle’s framework; a positive measurement points the wheel away from the car. An ideal camber angle assures optimal tire efficiency, proper steering control, and helps prevent rolling.
Toe:
A faulty toe angle will wear down your tires. Like camber and caster, toe is measured by degrees. When your front or rear wheels have front edges pointed toward each other, the pair is called “toe-ins.” If the front edges point away from each other, the pair is called “toe-outs.” With properly aligned wheels, you’ll get:
  • Tires that last longer
  • Easier steering
  • Improved gas mileage
  • Smoother ride
  • Safer, more secure driving
Batteries and Electrical System
Let’s face it: you can have the most meticulously maintained vehicle on the road, but it won’t start without the right battery – properly installed and appropriately fitted – for your driving needs. From ignition to door locks, your car battery allows you to get from point “A” to point “B.” The following is a brief overview of the electrical system that makes transportation possible:
  • BatteryComposed of a series of lead plates submerged in a 35% sulfuric acid/65% water solution, your 12-volt battery houses a chemical reaction that releases electrons through conductors, producing electricity which is then channeled into your vehicle’s electrical system. The battery supplies electricity to all of the electrical system components, including the essential power required to start your vehicle. In periods of high demand, the battery also supplements power from the charging system.
  • Charging SystemThe charging system is the life force of your vehicle’s electrical system, consisting of three main mechanisms: the alternator, various circuits, and the voltage regulator. The alternator:
    1. Provides power to the electrical system, and
    2. Recharges the battery when the car is running.
    The circuits act as conduits for electrical power. The voltage regulator controls the voltage passed through the circuits. Remember, all of these components require consistent attention and maintenance. It’s not just your battery that needs to be replaced; if any components fail, your power source is reduced to a lifeless, twenty pound paper weight.
  • Starting SystemIt may seem obvious that the starting system turns your vehicle’s engine on, but did you know that this process consumes more electrical power than anything else your car does? The starting system consists of three components working one after another. These components include: the ignition switch, the starter relay (or solenoid), and the starter motor.Here’s how it works:Turning the ignition causes a small amount of current to pass through the starter relay, causing a stronger current to flow through the battery cables and into the starter motor. The starter motor cranks the engine, forcing the piston to create enough suction that draws a fuel and air mixture into the cylinder. The ignition system creates a spark that ignites the mixture and your engine starts.Contact us for battery replacement or electrical system repairs.
Belts & Hoses
Among all the equipment in your vehicle, belts and hoses have the shortest lifespan. These components often crack, leak, or fray due to their constant exposure to heat, vibration, and other harmful chemicals. If not promptly replaced and maintained, it could spell disaster for your vehicle’s performance. Belt and hose evaluations based solely on their appearance are not enough. We recommend diligent inspection, and are here to do it. Here is a sample of how we ensure belt and hose quality: Visual Inspection of Belts
  • Search for clear indications of damage (cracking, glazing, softening, or peeling)
  • Test for correct tension
  • Test for correct alignment
  • Record belt condition for future reference
Visual Inspection of Hoses
  • Search for leaks, cracks, hardening, or softening.
  • Test cooling system for leaks using state-of-the-art pressure technology
  • Record hose condition for future reference
Get your vehicle’s belts and hoses inspected on a regular basis because damaged pieces can seriously harm your vehicle. Research shows that while most people get regular oil changes, they neglect the condition of their belts and hoses. A leaking hose or a cracked belt will cause you more trouble than an overdue oil change ever will. The following is a brief description of some of the different belts and hoses we inspect: Drive Belts: The engine drives some of your vehicle’s accessories. Instead of being supplied by electric power, these accessories rely on a series of pulleys and belts to operate. Some of these accessories include:
  • Power steering pump
  • Alternator
  • Air conditioning compressor
  • Radiator cooling fan
  • Water pump
Some vehicles require a single serpentine belt to power these accessories (as opposed to several individual belts). Hoses: If you think of hoses as your vehicle’s circulatory system, then you’ll have an appropriate representation of their importance. Hoses are composed of two rubber layers with fabric in between. Types of hoses vary on make and model, but typically include:
  • Fuel hose (sends gasoline from the gas tank to the engine)
  • Radiator hose (delivers coolant to engine)
  • Power steering hose (connects power steering pump to steering equipment)
  • Heater hose (provides coolant to heater core)
Brake Service
Our ASE-certified technicians take professionalism to the next level by offering courteous and knowledgeable service to all of our customers. Continually striving to master every aspect of automotive care, ASE technicians follow Motorist Assurance Program Uniform Inspection Guidelines for your vehicle’s braking system to assure safe, smooth driving. When your mechanic is wearing the ASE patch, don’t expect to get to know him—you won’t be back in a long time! That’s because our ASE technicians do the job right the first time. They inspect the following braking components: Disc Brakes:
  • Disc brake rotors and pads
  • Calipers and hardware
Drum Brakes:
  • Brake drums and shoes
  • Wheel cylinders
  • Return springs
Parking Brake:
  • Cables
Hydraulic System:
  • Master cylinder
  • Brake fluid and hoses
  • Power booster
Your vehicle’s brake system is a culmination of over 100 years of technological innovation, transforming crude stopping mechanisms into dependable and efficient equipment. While brake systems vary by make and model, the basic system consists of disc brakes in front and either disk or drum brakes in back. Connected by a series of tubes and hoses, your brakes link to each wheel and to the master cylinder, which supply them with vital brake fluid (hydraulic fluid). We can summarize all of your braking equipment into two categories, Hydraulics and Friction Material:
Hydraulics
Master Cylinder: The master cylinder is like a pressure converter. When you press down on the brake pedal (physical pressure), the master cylinder converts this to hydraulic pressure, and brake fluid moves into the wheel brakes. Brake Lines and Hoses: Brake lines hoses deliver pressurized brake fluid to the braking unit(s) at each wheel. Wheel Cylinders and Calipers: Wheel Cylinders surrounded by two rubber-sealed pistons connect the piston with the brake shoe. Push the brakes and the pistons stop and the shoes pushes into the drum. Calipers squeeze brake pads onto the rotor to stop your car. Both components apply pressure to friction materials.
Friction Materials
Disc Brake Pads and Drum Brake Shoes: A disc brake uses fluid (released by the master cylinder) to force pressure into a caliper, where it presses against a piston. The piston then squeezes two brake pads against the rotor, forcing it to stop. Brake shoes consist of a steel shoe with friction material bonded to it. How It Comes Together: When you first step on the brake pedal, you are triggering the release of brake fluid into the system of tubes and hoses, which travel to the braking unit at each wheel. You actually push against a plunger in the master cylinder, releasing fluid. Brake fluid can’t be compressed. It moves through the network of tubes and hoses in the exact same motion and pressure that initiated it. When it comes to stopping a heavy steel machine at high speed, this consistency is a good thing. The performance of your brakes can be affected when air gets into the fluid; since air can compress, it creates sponginess in the pedal, which disrupts consistency, and results in bad braking efficiency. “Bleeder screws” (located at each wheel cylinder) remove unwanted air in your system. A car without functioning brakes is dangerous. In many cases, warning signs will tell you if your car’s brakes may need service. Warning signs include:
  • Squealing or grinding noises when using brakes. This could mean your brakes need to be adjusted or that your brake pads are worn and need replacement.
  • Your dashboard’s Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) light turns on. This indicates that your brake fluid is low. You may have a leak in your brake line. Get it inspected.
  • While braking, your car pulls to one side. This means that your brakes need adjustment, there is brake fluid leakage, or your brakes are worn out and need replacement.
  • Your brakes are hard to press down or feel “spongy.” Usually this means air has gotten into your brake lines or you may have low brake fluid.
  • When applying your brakes, your steering wheel, brake pedal, or entire vehicle begins to shake. If this happens, your brake rotors could be warped and need replacement.
When you notice any brake warning signs, contact our professional staff by phone, or email, immediately and we’ll take care of it.
Tire Sales & Installation
Your vehicle’s tires make constant contact with the road. Over time and with normal wear-and-tear, your become worn down. This can be dangerous when braking on wet or snow-covered roads. Hydroplaning occurs when the tire’s grooves are so worn down that they don’t channel water out from beneath the tread. When this happens, your treads only skim the water’s surface and the steering wheel won’t respond. Keep your tires in working condition. How do I know if I need new tires?
    • Your tread depth is below 1/16 of an inch (1.6 millimeters). To get a rough idea of your tread depth, use a penny and insert it “head down” into the tread. If you can see Lincoln’s entire head, you need new tires.
    • Your tread wear indicator bar is visible. Flat rubber bars run perpendicular to the tread. If you see them, it’s time for new tires.
    • Your tire’s sidewall is showing visible cracks or cuts. Take this seriously; your tires may soon start to leak.
    • Your tires have developed bulges or blisters. Weak spots on tires show up around blisters or bulges and can blow out your tires.
If you see any of these signs, you need to have them checked and replaced. We carry a number of brand name tires to choose from, and our trained technicians will install them properly. Come in to our shop, call, or email us, and we will assist you.

What Our Customers Are Saying

Don’t just take it from us, let our customers do the talking!
“Used for a Hertz rental. Excellent service and great value.” Jan Ringnalda

“K-Ceps is an excellent body shop. They are way ahead of the other shops with their systems and technology, and that means their estimates are accurate and the work is done on time. They repaired my 2011 Honda Civic and it looked just like new when it was done. They also have a rental car agency there, which makes everything very convenient. I couldn’t be more impressed with these guys.” Aaron May

“K-Ceps is the best of the best. Nobody does auto body repair better. They operate with the highest integrity and with all of the latest state-of-the-art technology. You can’t ask for anything more.” Roy Holcombe

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